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Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake. —  2 Cor. xii. 10.

5. 

Christians to-day should be able to say, with the sweet sincerity of the apostle, “I take pleasure in infirmities,” — I enjoy the touch of weakness, pain, and all suffering of the flesh, because it compels me to seek the remedy for it, and to find happiness, apart from the personal senses. The holy calm of Paul’s well-tried hope met no obstacle or circumstances paramount to the triumph of a reasonable faith in the omnipotence of good, involved in its divine Principle, God: the so-called pains and pleasures of matter were alike unreal to Jesus; for he regarded matter as only a vagary of mortal belief, and subdued it with this understanding.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Miscellaneous Writings, p.200:20-31)

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Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake. —  2 Cor. xii. 10.

4. 

The apostle Paul insists on the rare rule in Christian Science that we have chosen for a text; a rule that is susceptible of proof, and is applicable to every stage and state of human existence. The divine Science of this rule is quite as remote from the general comprehension of mankind as are the so-called miracles of our Master, and for the sole reason that it is their basis. The foundational facts of Christian Science are gathered from the supremacy of spiritual law and its antagonism to every supposed material law.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Miscellaneous Writings, p.200:11-20)

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Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake. —  2 Cor. xii. 10.

3. 

It was the consummate naturalness of Truth in the mind of Jesus, that made his healing easy and instantaneous. Jesus regarded good as the normal state of man, and evil as the abnormal; holiness, life, and health as the better representatives of God than sin, disease, and death. The master Metaphysician understood omnipotence to be All-power: because Spirit was to him All-in-all, matter was palpably an error of premise and conclusion, while God was the only substance, Life, and intelligence of man.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Miscellaneous Writings, p.200:1-10)

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Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake. —  2 Cor. xii. 10.

2. 

The Principle of these marvellous works is divine; but the actor was human. This divine Principle is discerned in Christian Science, as we advance in the spiritual understanding that all substance, Life, and intelligence are God. The so-called miracles contained in Holy Writ are neither supernatural nor preternatural; for God is good, and goodness is more natural than evil. The marvellous healing-power of goodness is the outflowing life of Christianity, and it characterized and dated the Christian era.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Miscellaneous Writings, p.199:23-31)

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Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecutions, in distresses for Christ’s sake. —  2 Cor. xii. 10.

1. 

The miracles recorded in the Scriptures illustrate the life of Jesus as nothing else can; but they cost him the hatred of the rabbis. The rulers sought the life of Jesus; they would extinguish whatever denied and defied their superstition. We learn somewhat of the qualities of the divine Mind through the human Jesus. The power of his transcendent goodness is manifest in the control it gave him over the qualities opposed to Spirit which mortals name matter.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Miscellaneous Writings, p.199:11-22)

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Another day she asked us each what church we had been affiliated with before coming into Christian Science. When we all had answered, she turned to a blackboard and carefully drew a small circle. “That is the sum-total of all the churches under Old Theology,” she said. Then she drew another circle about the same size, near it but not touching the first, “That is all of you.” Then she drew a large circle embracing the two, and encompassing them, but not touching either of them. “And that is Christian Science,” she said. How easily she could have said of the large circle, “And that is I, Mrs. Eddy,” but she was always sharply aware of herself as the Discoverer of Science and always was strict in keeping herself personally away from the purity of Christian Science. She was the one who had brought Science, the Science was impersonal.  Mary Baker Eddy

(Chanfrau, Henrietta, Reminiscences of Mary Baker Eddy, p.3)