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Whenever you treat a patient, include in your understanding of the case the idea that no ignorant or malicious mind can affect the case and there will be no relapse. Progress is the law of the infinite, and finite views are but suppositions and beliefs. Realize this as a law for every case you treat. A mortal cannot make laws and the real man is not the law-maker.   Mary Baker Eddy

(Oakes, Richard, Course In Divinity and General Collectanea, p.265-266)

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7.

The valve of the heart, opening and closing for the blood, is not less obedient to mind than our hands, that perform the offices of our will; but because mind embraces one action consciously and not the other, we say the cause is physical and not mental. Stop the action of mortal mind wholly, by what is termed death, and every function of the body mortal ceases; proving organic action produced by mind and not matter. Brains are totally ignorant of thoughts; matter has no consciousness of its own, and its propelling power is mind; all mechanism is controlled by mind.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health, 1st ed., 346)

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6.

We are willing to leave the explanation of light and its effect on the earth, to science, and because sense takes no cognizance, a portion of the twenty-four hours, of the sun, never say it has no effect on the earth, or deny there is a sun, or that the earth borrows light and heat from the sun. No more should we deny the effect of mind on the body because the belief that produces this effect is below the mental horizon, not having risen yet to recognition. (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health, 1st ed., p,.345-346)

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5.

When darkness is over the earth, personal sense cannot say where the sun is, or that there is a sun; our antipodes must tell us this, or we must learn it of science. Thus it is with mind; the very reverse of what we are thinking at present, is often the remote cause or belief that has produced the inharmony of the body, and we must learn this belief of its opposite thought or the effect oil the body, or submit its character and relations to science.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health, 1st ed., p,.345)

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4.

Accordingly, the thought that has risen above the verge of unconscious mind is the only one recognized, but it has acted before, and effects have followed this action all the same as when the thought became conscious. The mortal body, of matter, is but a grosser strata of mortal mind.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health 1st ed., p.345)

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3.

Supposing a dose of poison be administered through mistake, and physician and patient are looking for favorable results when the patient dies, — did mind produce this? As surely as if it bad been consciously done Mind is ever active, for action signifies mind and the remote and predisposing thought furnishes a link to the present, although what we term personal sense knows this not. (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health 1st ed., p.345)

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2.

But to govern the body harmoniously with mind, you must understand the science of being predicated on mind and not matter. Few will admit that what is termed involuntary organic action is governed alone by mind, or that mind unconsciously controls the body, but man presents this phenomenon every moment, who comprehends not his own being, for this proves ignorance of mind’s action on the body. (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health 1st ed., p.344-345)

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1.

Mind produces what is termed organic disease, as directly as it does hysteria, and cures it as readily; the demonstration we have given of this removes the question beyond cavil. We predicate this science on proof, and have not more evidence of our existence, than we have gained of the utter control mind holds over the entire organization and functions of the body. Through mind alone we have cured organic disease of the lungs, liver, heart, brains, bones, muscles, etc., that defied physiology and materia medica to heal.  (Eddy, Mary Baker, Science and Health, 1st ed., p.344)